Study | Body Positive News

No new HIV infections seen in San Francisco's Strut PrEP programme

Study with 1200 clients on PrEP and no HIV infections to date
A community-based sexual health clinic in San Francisco has offered nurse-led pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) services to more than 1200 clients and has seen no HIV infections to date, according to a presentation last month at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban, South Africa. Read More...

Efavirenz appears to be associated with elevated suicide risk in START trial

efavirenz had an increased risk of suicidal and self-injuring behaviour
Participants in the START treatment-timing trial who took antiretroviral regimens containing efavirenz had an increased risk of suicidal and self-injuring behaviour than those not using efavirenz, though the number of events was small and the effect was mainly seen among people with a prior psychiatric diagnosis, according to research presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last month in Durban, South Africa. Read More...

Still no transmissions seen from people with an undetectable viral load in PARTNER study

PARTNER Study - still zero transmissions
Odds of seeing a transmission now even lower, but more data still needed on gay men, say researchers

The PARTNER study, which two years ago created headlines by establishing that the chance of an HIV-positive person with an undetectable viral load transmitting their virus was very low and quite possibly zero, released new data at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) that further refined this estimate. Read More...

Personalised app responds to unique health needs of HIV-affected groups

19Jan16
A global team of medical researchers from NZ and the UK are developing a transformative health app to help support positive health changes in people living with HIV.

Between January and September 2016, researchers will recruit PLHIV to participate in an online survey. User feedback pooled from the survey will help the research team understand key issues faced by PLHIV so they can be integrated into the final app design. There’s no obligation, but all interested parties affected by HIV who wish to contribute to the app design can register at www.mpowr.life/project Read More...

Third of people with HIV who use drugs intentionally miss doses of HIV treatment when planning to use drugs

25Aug15
Beliefs about possible toxic interactions between antiretroviral therapy (ART) and illicit drugs are causing large numbers of people living with HIV who use drugs to intentionally miss doses of their HIV treatment when planning drug use, US investigators report in the online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

The prospective study involved 530 people reporting current drug use in Atlanta. All were taking ART and approximately a third reported missing treatment doses because of beliefs about potential interactions with drugs and alcohol. This planned non-adherence was associated with sub-optimal compliance to treatment and poor control of viral load. Read More...

Depression strongly associated with risky sex in UK gay men

03Jun15_1
HIV-negative gay men who have several symptoms of depression are more likely to report sex without a condom, according to a study presented to the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) conference in Glasgow.

Several past studies have shown that poor mental health is frequently experienced by gay men. Some American studies have found an association between depression and risky sex, or depression and seroconversion to HIV, but there has been little data on the issue in HIV-negative gay men in the UK. Read More...

START trial finds that early treatment improves outcomes for people with HIV

03Jun15
Starting at a CD4 count over 500 cells/mm3 is safer than waiting till 350 cells/mm3.

A major international randomised clinical trial has found that people living with HIV have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral treatment (ART) sooner, when their CD4 cell count is above 500 cells/mm3, instead of waiting until their CD4 cell count drops below 350 cells/mm3. Read More...

HIV positive workers take less than a week off

20May15
The majority of people living with HIV take less than four days off work a year but still find it hard to get protection, research has shown.

The study by medical financial advisers Unusual Risks showed that 89 per cent of HIV positive people took less than a week in sick leave a year.

Meanwhile, 74 per cent said they had taken less than the national average of four days. Read More...

No HIV transmissions from HIV-positive partner seen in Australian gay couples study

01Mar15
An Australian-based study of gay male couples of opposite HIV status (serodifferent couples) has so far seen no transmissions from the HIV-positive partner within the couple in a two-year interim analysis.

The Opposites Attract study started recruiting in May 2012. It recruits gay male serodifferent couples regardless of whether the HIV-positive partner is on antiretroviral therapy (ART) or has an undetectable viral load, and also regardless of whether or not they use condoms. Read More...

HIV treatment at CD4 above 500 beneficial in African study

27Feb15
Starting HIV treatment at a CD4 cell count above 500 reduced the risk of tuberculosis, other serious illnesses and death by 44% when compared to starting treatment according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines.

The Temprano study, conducted over seven years in Ivory Coast, was designed to test the safety and efficacy of early treatment initiation compared to standard treatment initiation in a lower-income setting with a high prevalence of tuberculosis and bacterial infections. There may be particular benefits to starting HIV treatment early in settings where such infections cause substantial ill health in people living with HIV. Read More...

A game-changer: 86% fewer HIV infections in two PrEP studies

26Feb15
The most exciting news from CROI concerns pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the use by HIV-negative people of antiretrovirals to prevent HIV infection.

Two studies of PrEP in gay men and trans women have demonstrated that the availability of PrEP reduced the rate of infection by 86%. This amounts to the highest effectiveness yet seen for PrEP and is superior to most other HIV prevention interventions. Extraordinarily, two separate studies which provided PrEP in very different ways found exactly the same level of effectiveness. Read More...